A Heart Traced in Sand


Chapter One

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235 pages,
17 illustrations


Winner of the
PINNACLE BOOK ACHIEVEMENT AWARD
NORTH AMERICAN BOOKDEALERS EXCHANGE

also

AWARD OF MERIT
Writer's Digest
2001 NATIONAL SELF-PUBLISHED BOOK AWARD

A Heart Traced In Sand
Reflections on a Daughter's Struggle for Life

Naomi dancing

I began to see that Naomi’s journey was spiritual, the ultimate drama of the heart. She will need to find her strength, I told myself, and any weakness in her will be severely tested. Like a warrior on a battlefield facing overwhelming odds, she might doubt her powers to overcome, only to go deeper into her soul for courage, relying on God and every ounce of will to carry her onward. Excerpted from Chap. 3 pg's. 44-45

 

Boone's remarkable memoir of his daughter, Naomi, in the last two years of her life is a devastating and inspirational account of cancer and human determination. In unerring prose, Boone tells of the teenager's seemingly indomitable spirit and iron will to live after she is diagnosed at the age of 17. Boone, a New Mexico artist, is also unfailingly honest about his own feelings during the ordeal, and the book is as much about his personal crisis as it is Naomi's fight. Boone quotes from Baha'i, Christian, and Hindu scriptures. Although the reader knows Naomi will die in the end, as her story unfolds it's impossible not to believe she will somehow pull through. Her final breakdown comes as a shock. A teenager in love with life, she struggles daily to be brave and thankful. When traditional therapies fail, Naomi turns wherever hope is left—shark cartilage, apricot pits, protein treatments. Even when there is nothing left to do but die, Naomi has hope. Though there are many books about courage in the face of cancer, this one grabs readers by the heart and sweeps them along. Naomi, so special yet so familiar, is an irresistible heroine—miraculous despite her failure to find a cure. The fact that Boone, who isn't a professional writer, rendered such a tightly edited and moving narrative seems a miracle too.
—Review, January 2002 issue of Today’s Librarian

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